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College of Arts & Sciences

Early Modern History Courses

  • HIST 3000 - Atlantic History

    Using a comparative global perspective, explores the interactions between Europe, Africa, and the Americas during the age of European oceanic expansion. Covers Spanish, Portuguese, French, Dutch, and English empires and societies, Native American societies and interactions with Europeans, African societies, the rise of the slave trade and growth of African-American identity. Other topics include migration, the Columbian exchange, war, trade, religion, piracy, gender, and metropolitan authority. Encourages comparison between empires, cultures, and geographical regions even as it appreciates how intertwined and entangled these histories sometimes could be.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3002 - Colonial British North America

    Covers North American history from initial British settlement to the conclusion of the French and Indian War. In this time British colonies evolved into increasingly mature, stable societies. Demographic and economic expansion made possible a prosperous and relatively egalitarian society, which in turn affected the legal and political settlement. Yet, amidst all these promising developments, African slavery and the dispossession of Native Americans became ever more deeply entrenched. Examines the expansion of the British American empire and the costs this empire exacted. Topics covered include: pre-Columbian Native American societies, early English settlement, the Caribbean, comparative colonial development, trade, political culture, gender relations and the construction of family, witchcraft, war, migration, evangelical awakenings, urbanization, consumption, and slavery.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3004 - Revolutionary Era

    Causes of American Revolution and struggle for independence. Confederation, movement for new government, framing of Constitution.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3008 - Early U.S. Republic

    Examines the earliest decades of the new United States, including how diverse peoples in different regions, ethnic groups, and classes struggled to coexist and define what it meant to live under the republican form of government created in 1776 and consolidated in 1787. Will include topics such as institution building, westward expansion and its effects on Native and African-Americans, the nation's place on the world stage, the War of 1812, the emergence of partisanship and party systems, competing understandings of political economy, political culture, and life in the early Republic.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3018 - History of the American South to 1900

    Study of the diverse peoples and dynamic socioeconomic, cultural, and political processes that shaped the American South and affected its relationship to the broader world from the colonial period to the emergence of a "New South." Examines the origins and effects of racism and slavery; the regional and national institutions created to sustain and extend slavery; its destruction in the midst of the Civil War; and the complex realities and legacy of emancipation for the region and the nation.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3020 - Survey of American Indian History

    Treats Indian societies before European contact; cultural contact, negotiation, and conflict with Spanish, English, and French settlers; United States policy toward Indians; and Indian peoples' diverse strategies of preservation, adaptation, resistance, and accommodation from first contact to the present.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3200 - Women in American History Before 1877

    American women's history from the colonial era through Reconstruction. Topics include the traditional life of Native American women, witchcraft in colonial New England, women in the American Revolution, African- American women in slavery, early American childbirth customs, the early women's rights crusade, women on the trans-Mississippi frontier, and women in the Civil War.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3230 - Latin American History: The Colonial Era

    Examines historical origins of Latin American society. Themes include internal nature of Iberian and pre-Columbian Indian societies, circa 1492; conquest and subordination of Amerindian civilizations by Spain and Portugal; distribution of power, land, and labor in post-conquest Latin America; order and instability in colonial society; and region's position in international economy.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2CP

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3270 - Slavery in the Americas

    Examines the lives and experiences of slaves of African origin and descent as revealed by themselves in slave accounts and other documents. Explores, in a comparative perspective, African and Afro-American agency and identity in various New World societies.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3410 - History of Africa to 1850

    Provides an introductory overview of the peoples and states of Africa, and their developments over time. Focusing primarily on the sub-Saharan regions, will explore a variety of sources that historians of Africa use to examine issues such as state formation, trade and commerce, gender and society, and slavery.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2CP

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3542 - The European Reformation

    Protestant, Catholic, and Counter-Reformations in Europe, showing their relationships to social, political, economic, and religious movements of 15th- and 16th- centuries. Roles of Luther, Zwingli, Calvin, Erasmus, Loyola, etc.; Protestant and Catholic churches and sects in western and eastern Europe.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3580 - Power and Revolution in Early Modern Europe, 1450-1650

    Explores major political, economic, social and religious developments in Europe from the Age of Discovery (the Americas) to the Thirty Years' War. Will explore this period as one of ideological change through emphasis on "revoltuions" in world-view, religion, social structure, politics and science/medicine in Europe.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3581 - Politics, Power and People in Europe, 1650-1775

    Explores major political, economic, intellectual and social developments in Europe (particular attention given to France, Spain, Germany), 1650 to eve of French Revolution. Emphasis on absolutism & despotism, diplomatic revolution, competition for empire, Enlightenment and emergence of a 'public' as agent of change.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3600 - Women in Early Modern European History, 1400-1800

    Explores the social, cultural,political, and economic roles of women in Europe from the 15th- through the 18th- centuries. Students will examine women as monarchs, nobles and peasants; as actresses, musicians, and playwrights; as mothers, wives, and daughters; as Christians, Jews, and Muslims; as scientists and scholars; and as witches, prostitutes,and criminals. Key issues will include women's political power and participation in politics; sexuality and the body; women's spiritual and religious roles; and women's interactions with men. The Early Modern period sets the stage for a changing history of women in Europe, and the class will thus underline the ways in which women's roles evolved and changed over the course of early modern Europe.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3710 - Magic, Heresy and Witchcraft in Europe

    History of dangerous beliefs and practices in Europe from antiquity through the 18th- century; historical origins; legal treatment and punishment; roles of gender, the law, church and state; Inquisition and witch hunts and trials.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3715 - Sex, Crime and Deviance in Europe, 1200-1800

    Explores sexuality, deviance and crime in early modern Europe, contrasting imaginary crimes, e.g. witchcraft, with "real" crimes such as highway robbery and infanticide. Examines impact of gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, and class in process of criminalization in European history, 1200-1800. Traces long-term changes in the definition, incidence and prosecution of particular crimes to changes in economy, social structure, government, religion and culture.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3820 - History of Russia

    Russian origins, Greek and Mongol influences, expansion of Muscovy, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, Catherine the Great, Russia as great power, and shapes of its 19th-century society.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3860 - Shakespeare's England, 1450-1603

    Surveys English history from the Wars of the Roses until the death of Queen Elizabeth I in 1603. During this period, England went from a country ravaged by internal war and depression to one characterized at home by peace, law and order, a rising prosperity, artistic and intellectual excellence, and abroad by war as its people and power spread beyond the shores of the British Isles. Major themes to be considered include the establishment of legal and social order in the wake of the Wars of the Roses; the Tudor ¿revolution in government; the Henrician and Protestant Reformations and their effects on English political, social, and cultural life; the economic disaster of the mid sixteenth century; overseas exploration; the flowering of English culture and the arts; war with Spain; relations with Scotland and Ireland; and the ways in which England was governed.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3861 - Revolutionary Britain, 1603-1702

    Surveys English history during the reign of the Stuarts. Major themes to be considered include the union of the crowns of England and Scotland and the problems of multiple monarchies; the nascent British empire; the nature of religious life in a post-Reformation world; the often fractious relationship between religion and politics; radicalism during the Civil War and Interregnum and its lasting effects on English political, religious, intellectual, and cultural life; and England's roles on the European and world stages.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3862 - English History to 1688

    Surveys the social, political, religious, and constitutional history of England from its first settlement until the end of James II's reign. Major topics to be considered include the impact of the Roman, Christian, Viking, and Norman conquests of England; the demographic, social, and political crises of the late medieval period; religious reformation during the 16th- century; and England's relationship to Britain, Europe, and the world.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3864 - Making Modern Britain, 1702-1815

    Surveys Britain's history between the War of the Spanish Succession and the end of the Napoleonic Wars. Major themes to be considered include the development of a fiscal-military state; the birth of modern party politics; economic growth and its consequences; the expansion of Britain's world power and the loss of its North American colonies; the place of religious beliefs and institutions in an increasingly polite and commercial society; the pressures for social and political reforms; and the "Second Hundred Years War" with France.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

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