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College of Arts & Sciences

Pre-Modern History Courses

  • HIST 3281 - Jewish History Since 1492

    History of the Jewish people since 1492, covering developments in religion, culture and society in Europe, America and the Middle East, especially the themes of diaspora, Emancipation, secularization, Reform and Conservative movements, Zionism, the impact of immigration, the World Wars, the Holocaust and the foundation of the State of Israel.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3290 - Ancient Near East: Egypt, Mesopotamia, and the Levant

    Begins with the Neolithic Revolution and the origins of civilization in the Ancient Near East and Egypt, including the Sumerians, Babylonians, Egyptians, Hebrews, Philistines, Phoenicians and Persians. Assignments and lectures are based on both archaeological and literary sources.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3291 - Ancient Greece

    Begins with the emergence of the ancient Greeks of the Mycenaean Age and Homer's epics, moving on to the emergence of city-states with a focus on Athens and Sparta. Will also cover political and military history from the Persian wars to the conquests of Alexander the Great. Students will also learn about the society and culture of ancient Greece, including topics such as slavery, women's lives, religion and philosophy. Assigned reading includes histories, poems, philosophy, and dramatic works, as well as visual arts and archaeological evidence.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3292 - Ancient Rome

    Begins with the Etruscans and the origins of Rome, continuing through the Roman Republic and Empire. Topics include Rome's military success, civil wars and political transformations, as well as religion, culture and daily life. Assignments are based on primary sources, including historical, literary and documentary texts as well as archaeological discoveries.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3293 - World of Late Antiquity: Culture and Society in the Late Roman Empire

    Beginning in the third century, the mighty Roman Empire began its slow but inevitable decline and fall, brought to a decisive end by the barbarian invasions of the late fourth and fifth century, epitomized by the sack of Rome by Goths in 410 and Vandals in 455, and terminated with the deposition of the last western emperor in 476. That is one vision of the period sometimes called Late Antiquity. The other vision sees the transformation of classical culture, closely related to the emergence of Christianity, and diverse political and social changes that would live on long after the imperial political order disappeared in the west. This course will take account of both these visions, with a strong preference for continuity over decline. Readings and lectures will explore important aspects of political, intellectual, religious, and social change. Discussions and written assignments will depend on the interpretation of primary sources, including a wide variety of literary and material evidence. The course is a bridge between the courses on the Roman Empire and Barbarian West, but students are not expected to have taken either course.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2CP

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3370 - Middle East History 600 to 1500

    Middle East history from the rise of Islam up to the emergence of the Gunpowder Empires of the Ottomans and Safavids. Topics include the establishment of the first Muslim community, the development and expansion of the Muslim state under various caliphates, the Islamic Golden Age, the Crusades, Mongol and Turkic invasions, developments in Islamic theologies and movements, and the nature of relations between Arab, Armenian, Kurdish, Persian, and Turkic communities.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3410 - History of Africa to 1850

    Provides an introductory overview of the peoples and states of Africa, and their developments over time. Focusing primarily on the sub-Saharan regions, will explore a variety of sources that historians of Africa use to examine issues such as state formation, trade and commerce, gender and society, and slavery.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2CP

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3450 - Southeast Asia to c. 1750: The Creative Synthesis

    Highlights of prehistory and proto-history and development of classical states. Emphasis on cultural synthesis (Hindu, Buddhist, Muslim, and animist influences) and theme of change and continuity in both great and little traditions of region.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2CP

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3463 - History of China from Antiquity to the Early Modern Era

    Present-day Chinese political, intellectual, and cultural leaders frequently claim that China has the longest continuous history of any nation in the world. Implicit in this statement is the argument that an appreciation of the deep Chinese past is necessary for any considered understanding of contemporary China. This course provides a narrative of that past by tracing the history of pre-dynastic and dynastic China from antiquity to the early modern era. The continuities and discontinuities between different historical periods are emphasized. The course concludes with a re-evaluation of what the Chinese past reveals about the Chinese present.

    Requisites: (Soph or Jr or Sr) and Warning: no credit for both this and the following: HIST 3460 or HIST 3461

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3480 - Traditional Japan

    Traces major elements of Japanese culture and thought from their origins, through major Chinese influence, results of medieval civil warfare (including development of Samurai values), and up to premodern workings of Japan's sophisticated commercial economy.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3501 - Nature, Science and Religion to 1800

    Overview of the history of science from the ancient world to the 17th- century. Examines areas of knowledge and technique most modern people consider to be a part of science, and some they do not, including medicine, astronomy, construction, mining, navigation, and warfare. Considers how politics, economy, gender, and religion affected the development of these technologies and sciences.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3520 - Roman Law & Society

    Historical introduction to Roman law, interpretation of legal sources, and especially the role of law in Roman society and culture. Chronological focus is on the Empire through the age of Justinian. After a survey of the origins of Roman law, lectures and readings use legal sources to look in two directions: downwards to the way law affected social life; upwards to how politics and governance affected law. Attention will be given throughout to how the nature of different types of legal evidence affect our interpretation of the purpose and effectiveness of law. Specific topics of focus will include the bearing of law on marriage and family life, slavery and freedom, surveillance, and religion.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2CP

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3531 - The Barbarian West: Europe 400-1000

    Foundation of Medieval synthesis, 300-1100; collapse of Roman world, establishment of successor states, spread of Christianity, formation and development of European culture.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3532 - History of the Crusades

    Surveys the major European crusades to the Middle East, with comparison to the Albigrensian, Iberian, and Baltic crusades. Focuses on the interaction and perspective of the different Christian, Jewish, and Muslim communities, and the impact of crusading ideology on western history.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3533 - Europe in the Middle Ages, 1000-1350

    Survey of Europe in the High Middle Ages (1000-1350), covering the cultures of chivalry and Scholasticism, the growth of cities, agricultural revolution, religious reform and persecution, holy wars, and the origins of the modern state.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3540 - History of Early Christianity

    Investigates historical development and spread of Christianity from its origins to about A.D. 600. Content includes Greek and Hebraic backgrounds, early church fathers of East and West, ecumenical councils, early heresies, and development of church doctrine.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3541 - Medieval Christianity: Church and Society

    Historical developments within Christian society between 5th- and 14th- centuries, with special focus on western Europe and the church of Rome. Includes the inner financial and legal workings of the church; monks as reformers and representatives of the papacy; heresy, mysticism, and the problem of uncovering popular devotion; the importance of gender in shaping religious theory and practice; cooperation and conflict between religious leaders and worldly rulers. Along with a textbook, students read, analyze, and discuss original source material in translation.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3555 - Women in Medieval Europe

    Selected topics in the history of European women between 500 and 1500, including sexuality, motherhood, family, work, Christianity (beliefs and practices), Islam and Judaism, rulership and power, sanctity, literacy, and love. Students will explore primary sources and current scholarship.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3560 - The Italian Renaissance

    Explores Italian urban life and culture, the courtly world of political elites, education reform and Humanism, religious expression and the Papal court, scientific and medical discovery, art and expressions of power in Italy, 1350-1550. It also examines the darker side of Renaissance culture - violence, sexual deviance, and social repression.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3562 - Muslims, Christians, and Jews in the History of Medieval Spain

    Covers the history of the Iberian peninsula from late antiquity to the Renaissance, focusing especially on the political cultural interactions of the Christians, Jews, and eventually Muslims under Visigothic Kings, the rise of the Cordoban Caliphate, and the process of Christian Reconquest. Particular attention is given to the internal state of "convivencia" - Living together of Christians, Jews and Muslims - as well as the relationship of Iberia to the wider European World.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

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