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College of Arts & Sciences

Undergraduate History Courses

  • HIST 1210 - Western Civilization: Antiquity to 1500

    Origins of Western heritage from antiquity to 1500. Included are such topics as religion, philosophy, literature, and visual arts, as well as major political events and developments.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2HL

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 1220 - Western Civilization: Modernity from 1500

    What is the West? Is there indeed a coherent, identifiable Western heritage? If so, what is distinctive about the West's heritage? And what, further, is distinctive about the West's modern heritage? Addresses these questions by way of an examination of major intellectual, cultural, and political developments from 1500 until the present. Topics to be considered include the Renaissance; the religious Reformations of the 16th- century; absolutism, constitutional monarchy, and enlightened despotism; the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment; the American and French Revolutions; industrialization and nation building; modernism; imperialism and the World Wars; and the rise and fall of totalitarian regimes in the 20th- century.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2HL

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 1222 - Medieval History in Film & Literature

    An introductory multimedia survey of medieval society and culture, especially but not exclusively European. The Middle Ages are commonly seen as primitive and barbaric, as pure and romantic, or as an infantile version of the modern world. This course invites students to test those generalizations against more critical views. Focus is on violence and religious life, two topics with a surprising amount of overlap between them. Along with reading primary sources, including warrior epics and saints' lives, students analyze a variety of films ranging from famous to obscure, artistic to graphic. Whatever the medium, we are concerned with improving our critical and interpretative skills, and with better understanding the challenges and possibilities for engaging with cultures other than our own.

    Credits: 4

    General Education Code: 2CP

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 4.0 lecture

  • HIST 1320 - Introduction to World History Before 1750

    Introduces cross-cultural perspectives in world history. Focus is on the major themes in human development, such as the history of the rise of civilization, world religions, and trading systems.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2CP

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 1330 - Introduction to World History Since 1750

    Introduces cross-cultural perspectives in world history. Focus is on the major themes in human development, such as the rise of nationalism, modernization, and westernization, in order to understand the nature of global and cultural interaction in the modern era.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2CP

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 2000 - Survey of United States History, 1600-1877

    A survey of American history from colonial origins through Reconstruction. The major political, social, cultural, and economic developments are discussed.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2SS

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History, 1865-present

    A survey of American history from Reconstruction to the present. The major political, social, cultural, and economic developments are discussed.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2SS

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 2200 - A Global Military History from Antiquity to the Present

    This is a survey on war in world history from ancient kingdoms and empires to present-day conflicts. These themes are central: war and the state; war and society; war and culture; war and trade; and conflict resolution. In the twenty-first century, the definition of "war" has broadened from our modern understanding as an armed conflict between states. Today, war is better defined as an armed conflict between organized groups, which includes states, terrorist groups, militias and warlords, and crime syndicates. "World," too, has taken on broader meaning: it is not simply a geographic term, but connotes connections between states and people. Studying war in history allows students to consider how societies have responded to change under duress, how technology has spread across the globe, how empires were built and how they collapsed, how ancient empires became modern states, and how modern culture emerged from the rubble of wars.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2SS

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 2270 - The Middle East and the World

    This course offers students an opportunity to critically explore the historical connections between Middle East history and other parts of the world. Structured as a chronological survey spanning the period of 600-1990 AD, the course covers events and processes related to developments in politics, economics, social organization, religion, science and technology, and culture. It highlights key moments in which dynamics in the Middle East shaped other parts of the world. Equally important will be those moments in which developments in other parts of the world helped shape the region. The survey will draw on connections between the Middle East and multiple other regions: Africa, South Asia, Southeast Asia, Europe, and the Americas. No prior historical or regional knowledge necessary.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2CP

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 2300 - Capitalism and Its Critics: An Intellectual History

    This course traces the ideas and practices that created the capitalist system in early modern Europe, saw its eventual rise to dominance by the late nineteenth century, and in so doing generated and continues to generate considerable criticism and a vibrant debate. This course both engages contemporary concerns and provides an historical account of the ideas and patterns of practice that shaped western and world economic culture from the sixteenth to the end of the twentieth century. It challenges students to understand capitalism less as a hegemonic, clearly-defined force, but rather as a multi-faceted concept that has, throughout history and in our own time informed the beliefs and actions of kings, philosophers, economists, producers, consumers, and citizens.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2SS

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 2.0 lecture, 1.0 discussion

  • HIST 2460 - The Rise of Modern Asia

    Introductory survey of the history of Asia from the early modern era to the present day. Emphasis on the rise of modern nationalism, economic development, and social and cultural achievements.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2CP

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 2530 - Life, Love, and Death in the Medieval World

    This course explores life in medieval Europe through the interpretation of contemporary sources, including saints' lives, chronicles written by conquerors and the conquered, first-hand murder accounts, and how-to guides composed for lovers, monks, knights, and architects. Lectures will also introduce evidence from archaeology and the visual arts to complement the literary record. This is a thematic course rather than a chronological survey. General topics include The World Around Them, Rules of Love, Culture of Violence, and Visions of the End.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2HL

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 2900 - Special Topics in History

    Specific course content will vary with offering.

    Credits: 1 - 15

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 1.0 lecture

  • HIST 2905 - Technology in World History

    From hand tools, stirrups, and windmills to lasers, batteries, and biotechnology, human history and technology can only be understood together. This course explores the ways in which technology has shaped human society from antiquity to the twentieth century. Beginning with a chronological survey that highlights key moments in in pre-modern societies, it then focuses on important themes in the last several centuries. These themes include transportation, industry, agriculture, war, and the environment, among others. In this way, technology provides a critical perspective for understanding modernization in a global context.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2SS

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 2950 - Introductory History Seminar

    Introduce students to the methods and sources used in the study of history. Students will read original sources and historical scholarship on a particular period or theme in history. Each week individuals will help lead discussion of the assigned readings, so that all students will encounter the challenges and rewards of scholarly exchange. Also provides students the chance to interact with each other and their professor in a small class environment.

    Requisites: Fr or Soph

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 seminar

  • HIST 2970T - Honors Tutorial Seminar

    Honors tutorial on topics in History

    Requisites: Permission required and HTC

    Credits: 1 - 15

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 15.0 tutorial

  • HIST 2971T - Honors Tutorial Study, Second Year, Non-thesis

    Individualized tutorial for HTC students only.

    Requisites: Permission required and HTC

    Credits: 1 - 15

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 15.0 tutorial

  • HIST 2980T - Honors Tutorial Study

    Honors tutorial on topics in History

    Requisites: Permission required and HTC

    Credits: 1 - 15

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 15.0 tutorial

  • HIST 2981T - Honors Tutorial Study, Second Year, Non-thesis

    Individualized tutorial for HTC students only.

    Requisites: Permission required and HTC

    Credits: 1 - 15

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 15.0 tutorial

  • HIST 3000 - Atlantic History

    Using a comparative global perspective, explores the interactions between Europe, Africa, and the Americas during the age of European oceanic expansion. Covers Spanish, Portuguese, French, Dutch, and English empires and societies, Native American societies and interactions with Europeans, African societies, the rise of the slave trade and growth of African-American identity. Other topics include migration, the Columbian exchange, war, trade, religion, piracy, gender, and metropolitan authority. Encourages comparison between empires, cultures, and geographical regions even as it appreciates how intertwined and entangled these histories sometimes could be.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3002 - Colonial British North America

    Covers North American history from initial British settlement to the conclusion of the French and Indian War. In this time British colonies evolved into increasingly mature, stable societies. Demographic and economic expansion made possible a prosperous and relatively egalitarian society, which in turn affected the legal and political settlement. Yet, amidst all these promising developments, African slavery and the dispossession of Native Americans became ever more deeply entrenched. Examines the expansion of the British American empire and the costs this empire exacted. Topics covered include: pre-Columbian Native American societies, early English settlement, the Caribbean, comparative colonial development, trade, political culture, gender relations and the construction of family, witchcraft, war, migration, evangelical awakenings, urbanization, consumption, and slavery.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3004 - Revolutionary Era

    Causes of American Revolution and struggle for independence. Confederation, movement for new government, framing of Constitution.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3008 - Early U.S. Republic

    Examines the earliest decades of the new United States, including how diverse peoples in different regions, ethnic groups, and classes struggled to coexist and define what it meant to live under the republican form of government created in 1776 and consolidated in 1787. Will include topics such as institution building, westward expansion and its effects on Native and African-Americans, the nation's place on the world stage, the War of 1812, the emergence of partisanship and party systems, competing understandings of political economy, political culture, and life in the early Republic.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3018 - History of the American South to 1900

    Study of the diverse peoples and dynamic socioeconomic, cultural, and political processes that shaped the American South and affected its relationship to the broader world from the colonial period to the emergence of a "New South." Examines the origins and effects of racism and slavery; the regional and national institutions created to sustain and extend slavery; its destruction in the midst of the Civil War; and the complex realities and legacy of emancipation for the region and the nation.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3020 - Survey of American Indian History

    Treats Indian societies before European contact; cultural contact, negotiation, and conflict with Spanish, English, and French settlers; United States policy toward Indians; and Indian peoples' diverse strategies of preservation, adaptation, resistance, and accommodation from first contact to the present.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3030 - United States in World War II

    Military and diplomatic role of U.S. in WWII; war's political, economic, and social impact on the nation.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3050 - The United States and the Vietnam War

    Examination of American experience in Vietnam, both in terms of military and diplomatic history of war itself, and its impact on American society.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3060 - American Environmental History

    A survey of the evolution, from 1492 to the present, of American attitudes toward and interactions with the natural world, including such topics as the Columbian Exchange, romanticism, the Western frontier, conservation, the "land ethic," and environmental policy in the 1960s and 1970s.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3070 - Famous Trials in American History

    Uses the medium of famous trials to explore the relationship between law and society in American history from the 17th- to the 20th- centuries. Some of the cases studied are landmarks in the history of law, while others provide social and cultural insights into a particular period of American history. Along the way, the class considers the role of governmental entities, the legal profession, the judiciary, the press, and the public in famous trials.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3081 - The Civil War and its Aftermath

    Explores the diverse individuals and processes that brought about the U.S. Civil War, determined its course and outcome, and shaped a complicated and contested settlement. Themes will include military engagements, expansionism, increased sectionalism, race and slavery, political parties, society and institutions in the Union and Confederacy, attempts to restructure Southern society, and developments at the national level in the post-war period.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3090 - American Constitutional History, Part 1: Origins to Reconstruction

    Traces the history of American constitutionalism from its English roots through the aftermath of the Civil War. While the purview is not restricted to the federal constitution, that document will form its chief focus. Ideas, institutions, and individuals responsible for the construction of America's unique constitutional heritage are studied in detail.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3095 - American Constitutional History, 1880s-Present

    Studies the history of American Constitutionalism from the last half of the 19th- century to the last half of the 20th. Concentration on the Federal Constitution and its role in shaping the public and private lives of Americans. Particular attention will be paid to the ideas, institutions, and individuals responsible for making the Constitution a battleground rife with intellectual, social, and cultural significance.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3100 - Emergence of the Modern United States: Progressive Era and Roaring Twenties

    Emphasis on political and cultural history. Major topics include "crisis" of the 1890s; early 20th-century progressivism as an intellectual movement and its manifestations in state and local politics and legal traditions; presidencies of Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson; impact of World War I; origins of mass society in the 1920s, including cultural tensions, political and intellectual history.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3104 - United States, 1945-Present

    Emphasis on politics, culture, and foreign policy. Major topics include origins and nature of the Cold War; impact of foreign involvements on American politics; political leadership in the media age; radicalism and social change in the '60s and '70s; the rise of cultural politics and its effect on economic-based political coalitions; resurgence of conservatism in the '70s and '80s.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3106 - History of American Conservatism

    Introduces students to the intellectual, political, and cultural history of conservatism in the United States, with a major focus on the twentieth century. Identifies and examines the theorists, journalists, economists, politicians, literary figures, and activists who built a coherent body of conservative ideas and a political movement to challenge the prevailing liberal orthodoxy of the post-New Deal era. Highlights the major philosophical themes and practical aims that animated this diverse set of historical actors and often set them at odds with one another: preserving the values, traditions, and institutions that sustained local communities and the nation¿s constitutional order; maximizing individual liberty in an economic and social context; opposing various forms of collectivism and the encroachment of state power; fighting communism at home and abroad.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3110 - History of Public Health Disasters

    The class examines the history of public health in the United States through the study of salient public health disasters and explores the following questions: What has been the historic impact of public health disasters on societal attitudes toward disease, disease causation, and the treatment of disease? How do public health disasters prompt change in public and private life? Topics to be considered include the historical significance of virgin soil epidemics, yellow fever, small pox, cholera, bubonic plague, influenza, polio, vitamin-deficiency diseases, milk-borne and water-borne diseases, infant mortality, maternal mortality, tobacco use, HIV/AIDS, medical treatment as a health threat, and global warming.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3111J - Historical Research and Writing

    Deals with techniques and mechanics of historical research and writing. After introduction to use of primary and secondary sources and use of history reference material, students are guided through steps of research and writing; compiling bibliography, analysis of sources, organization of evidence, and style and composition of written paper.

    Requisites: Permission required and HIST major and (Jr or Sr)

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 1J

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 seminar

  • HIST 3140 - Pop/High Culture in 20th Century America

    Examines the history of popular and high culture, as well as their intersection, during the 20th- century, with special emphasis on the post-war years (1945 onwards). Moves chronologically and focus on works that include painting (from realism to popism), music (the rise of jazz and rock n' roll), literature (both popular and highbrow), humor (including standup), and movies. Cultural developments will be studied in their historical context and related to politics and society.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3144 - US Social History in the 20th century

    Social life, work, and gender and family roles in 20th- century America. Special focus on everyday life in the 1920s and during the Depression, experiences and responses to World War II and the Vietnam War, families and mass culture of the 1950s and 60s, and the development of environmentalism.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3146 - American Ideas, 20th- Century

    A study of big ideas in the American past. Moves chronologically from the Progressive Era up to the present while examining themes that include liberalism, conservatism, democracy, secularization, the role of religion in American life, theology, the threat of totalitarianism abroad, the rise of postmodernism and relativism, and other key issues. Ideas will be explored in historical context and related to key events and developments.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3148 - Cultural Rebels in the Modern U.S.

    Examines the history of cultural rebellion (or radicalism) in the 20th- century. Surveys rebellion from Greenwich Village at the turn of the century to the punk rock explosion of the 1970s and '80s. Larger questions include: How do people rebel in a culture that often seems to embrace rebellion? How do cultural rebels communicate their anger to the wider society? What impact does cultural rebellion make in American history?

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3150 - Survey of African American History

    Survey of African American History from the middle passage to the present. The development of African society in the American diaspora. Different societies under slavery. The abolitionist movement with the role of Black abolitionists. The Civil War and its impact on slavery. Examines the interaction between the African American community and the larger society. Reconstruction and its impact; the wars of the 20th- century and their continuing effects on African Americans, migration to the North, the Civil Rights movement, and the problems of equality.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3162 - History of U.S. Involvement in World Affairs, 1898-1945

    Examines United States involvement in world affairs from the Spanish-American War through the end of World War II, with particular emphasis on the emergence of the United States as a superpower. In addition to analyzing U.S. policies, it will also give attention to nongovernmental organizatons and actors.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3164 - History of U.S. Involvement in World Affairs, 1945-Present

    Examines United States involvement in the Cold War and the post-Cold War World, with emphasis on the causes and consequences of major wars and the use of major instruments of foreign policy, including foreign aid, covert intervention, and public diplomacy. In addition to analyzing U.S. government policies, it will also give attention to nongovernmental organizations and actors.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3170 - Survey of Ohio History

    A survey of Ohio history, from the time of the Mound builders, through the conflicts between the British and French empires, to the creation of Ohio as a state. Much of the focus is on the events of the 19th- century, as Ohio was a central battleground in conflicts over slavery and abolition, and labor and industrial groups. Also examines the process of deindustrialization in the later half of the 20th- century.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3200 - Women in American History Before 1877

    American women's history from the colonial era through Reconstruction. Topics include the traditional life of Native American women, witchcraft in colonial New England, women in the American Revolution, African- American women in slavery, early American childbirth customs, the early women's rights crusade, women on the trans-Mississippi frontier, and women in the Civil War.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3201 - Women in American History Since 1877

    American women's history since Reconstruction. Topics include the experiences of immigrant women in the United States, prostitution in the Gilded Age, the Progressive Era birth-control movement, achievement of the right to vote, women in the two world wars, women in the civil rights movement, the new feminist movement, the backlash against feminism, Roe v. Wade and the abortion debate.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3202 - Women's Health and Medicine in U.S. History

    Examines, from the colonial era to the present, changes in the medical treatment of women and changes in the definition of women's health and illness. Topics to be explored include the history of women and domestic health; women and public health; pregnancy, prenatal care, and prenatal testing; birth; breastfeeding; birth control; abortion; menstruation; menopause; infertility and assisted reproductive technologies; sexually-transmitted infections; women and addiction; breast cancer; and the impact of the inadequacies and inequities of contemporary health policy on women.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3211 - American Military History, 1600-Present

    Military institutions and civil-military relations in American history; role of technology in warfare; innovations and reforms in military; war and its conduct; military and civilian society in war and peace.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3213 - War, Violence, Modernity

    Explores the correlation of war, violence organized and controlled by the state or unbounded and uncontrolled, and modernity. It considers the relationship of state and society with regard to war and domestic order from the end of the Middle Ages (roughly the mid-15th- century) to the present. Geographic emphasis is on Europe and North America, but other parts of the world will be discussed where appropriate.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3220 - 1960s in U.S.: Decade of Controversy

    Allows students to go beyond the popular stereotypes of the 1960s to understand the decade as a period of social, cultural and political confrontation that laid the groundwork for life in the present-day United States. Primary focus on social protest movements of the era; the Civil Rights movement, the student movement, the antiwar movement, the counterculture, and the women's movement.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3224 - The 1980s in the U.S.: The Age of Reagan and Madonna

    Examines a pivotal decade, which has helped to shape the politics and culture of contemporary America. The focus will be on the presidency of Ronald Reagan and the growth of conservatism as well as liberal criticism of Reagan"s social, economic, and international policies. Special attention will be given to the decade's "culture wars" as well as the ways that new technology and cable networks such as CNN and MTV created new celebrities such as Madonna and helped blur the lines between entertainment and politics. The course also examines the end of the Cold War and its effects on the U.S. world role.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3230 - Latin American History: The Colonial Era

    Examines historical origins of Latin American society. Themes include internal nature of Iberian and pre-Columbian Indian societies, circa 1492; conquest and subordination of Amerindian civilizations by Spain and Portugal; distribution of power, land, and labor in post-conquest Latin America; order and instability in colonial society; and region's position in international economy.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2CP

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3231 - Latin American History: From Independence to the Present

    Examines Latin American history in the 19th- and 20th- centuries, focusing on causes and consequences of Independence; the political, social and economic challenges of nation-state formation; competing political/ideological responses to structural crisis in the 20th- century (social revolution, authoritarianism, democratic change); and ongoing search for viable formulas of economic development.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2CP

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3232 - History of Brazil

    Examines the history of Brazil from the colonial period to the late 20th- century, focusing on the role colonization; slavery; race and racism played in the social, political, and cultural formation; and development of the modern Brazilian nation.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3233 - The History of Modern Mexico

    Examination of social, political, economic and political development in Mexico during the 19th- and 20th- centuries. Special attention given to indigenous peoples, nation-state formation, modernization, revolution, consolidation of a one-party state, and democratization.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3250 - History of U.S.- Latin American Relations

    Survey of inter-American relations from the 19th- century. Focuses on evolving, and often conflicting, definitions of national interest that have shaped the United States and Latin American policy orientations toward each other.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3270 - Slavery in the Americas

    Examines the lives and experiences of slaves of African origin and descent as revealed by themselves in slave accounts and other documents. Explores, in a comparative perspective, African and Afro-American agency and identity in various New World societies.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3281 - Jewish History Since 1492

    History of the Jewish people since 1492, covering developments in religion, culture and society in Europe, America and the Middle East, especially the themes of diaspora, Emancipation, secularization, Reform and Conservative movements, Zionism, the impact of immigration, the World Wars, the Holocaust and the foundation of the State of Israel.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3290 - Ancient Near East: Egypt, Mesopotamia, and the Levant

    Begins with the Neolithic Revolution and the origins of civilization in the Ancient Near East and Egypt, including the Sumerians, Babylonians, Egyptians, Hebrews, Philistines, Phoenicians and Persians. Assignments and lectures are based on both archaeological and literary sources.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3291 - Ancient Greece

    Begins with the emergence of the ancient Greeks of the Mycenaean Age and Homer's epics, moving on to the emergence of city-states with a focus on Athens and Sparta. Will also cover political and military history from the Persian wars to the conquests of Alexander the Great. Students will also learn about the society and culture of ancient Greece, including topics such as slavery, women's lives, religion and philosophy. Assigned reading includes histories, poems, philosophy, and dramatic works, as well as visual arts and archaeological evidence.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3292 - Ancient Rome

    Begins with the Etruscans and the origins of Rome, continuing through the Roman Republic and Empire. Topics include Rome's military success, civil wars and political transformations, as well as religion, culture and daily life. Assignments are based on primary sources, including historical, literary and documentary texts as well as archaeological discoveries.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3293 - World of Late Antiquity: Culture and Society in the Late Roman Empire

    Beginning in the third century, the mighty Roman Empire began its slow but inevitable decline and fall, brought to a decisive end by the barbarian invasions of the late fourth and fifth century, epitomized by the sack of Rome by Goths in 410 and Vandals in 455, and terminated with the deposition of the last western emperor in 476. That is one vision of the period sometimes called Late Antiquity. The other vision sees the transformation of classical culture, closely related to the emergence of Christianity, and diverse political and social changes that would live on long after the imperial political order disappeared in the west. This course will take account of both these visions, with a strong preference for continuity over decline. Readings and lectures will explore important aspects of political, intellectual, religious, and social change. Discussions and written assignments will depend on the interpretation of primary sources, including a wide variety of literary and material evidence. The course is a bridge between the courses on the Roman Empire and Barbarian West, but students are not expected to have taken either course.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2CP

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3301 - African History Through Film

    Explores transformations in the nature of African societies, cultures and economies in the 20th- century, particularly in the post-1960 period. Film is used as a medium for studying issues as they are understood by Africans themselves. African filmmakers seen as social historians, historians concerned with the everyday nature of the lives of common people.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3320 - Women, Gender, and Sexuality in Middle East History

    Middle East history from the rise of Islam to the contemporary period, with particular attention to changing practices and discourses regarding women, gender, and sexuality. A key topic of concern is the changing Islamic legal interpretations on seclusion, veiling, marriage, divorce, inheritance, and abortion. Also important will be the experience of free and enslaved women of ruling families and elite households. The course will conclude with the changing nature of gender identities, practices, and roles in the 19th-century transformations, colonial rule, nationalist and labor movements, literary genres, authoritarian state formation, various modes of economic development, political Islam, occupation, and war.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3330 - Oil, the Persian Gulf, and World Power

    Examines the international politics of oil from a historical perspective, emphasizing the importance of the Persian Gulf. Topics include the roots and guiding principles behind oil policy; oil in the two world wars; postwar changes in global oil production, culminating in the oil crisis of the 1970s; the pattern and end of the British dominance in the Gulf; the subsequent expansion of the United States commitments in the region since the 1970s; the role of local nation-states, in particular Iran, Iraq, and Saudi Arabia; oil today, and prospects for the future.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3360 - History of North Africa

    Survey of the geographical setting, ethnic composition of the region; political, economic, and cultural developments from antiquity to the 19th- century; European colonization and African resistance; rise of nationalism; struggle for political independence; political, economic, and social problems in independent North Africa; North Africa in world affairs.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3370 - Middle East History 600 to 1500

    Middle East history from the rise of Islam up to the emergence of the Gunpowder Empires of the Ottomans and Safavids. Topics include the establishment of the first Muslim community, the development and expansion of the Muslim state under various caliphates, the Islamic Golden Age, the Crusades, Mongol and Turkic invasions, developments in Islamic theologies and movements, and the nature of relations between Arab, Armenian, Kurdish, Persian, and Turkic communities.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3371 - Middle East History 1500 to the present

    Middle East history from the consolidation of the Gunpowder Empires of the Ottomans and Safavids through the Arab uprisings. Topics include the Turko-Mongolian tradition of state building, the shifting balance of power with Europe, the 19th-century transformation, World War I and the emergence of the contemporary Middle East, colonial rule, nationalist, communist, labor, and Islamist mobilizations, the Israeli-Palestinian-Arab conflict, the Iranian Revolution, authoritarian rule, different modes of economic development, various wars, US policy, and the Arab uprisings.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3372 - Protest, Rebellion, and Revolution in the Modern Middle East

    This course provides an exploration of the history of mass politics in the modern Middle East. It takes as its central concern the emergence of popular politics and mass mobilizations in the 19th century and subsequent attempts to organize and manage them. Topics include late 19th-century workers and peasant movements, early 20th-century constitutional revolutions, the introduction of electoral politics, the formation of labor unions, suffragist movements, political parties, and various struggles and strategies to shape state policies, take control of states, or contain the threat posed by rival movements. The course considers both secular and religiously-inspired movements, as well as those across the right and left. No prior historical or regional knowledge needed.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3390 - Women in African History

    Will examine the variety of women's experiences and contributions to African history. Using examples from across the continent and different chronological periods, topics to be addressed include women's social, economic, and political roles and opportunities and changes over time and place; women's labor, including slavery; and debates concerning economic production vs. biological reproduction, the gendered division of labor, the control of women, and women's exploitation of women.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3410 - History of Africa to 1850

    Provides an introductory overview of the peoples and states of Africa, and their developments over time. Focusing primarily on the sub-Saharan regions, will explore a variety of sources that historians of Africa use to examine issues such as state formation, trade and commerce, gender and society, and slavery.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2CP

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3411 - History of Africa Since 1850

    Provides an introductory overview of the peoples and states of Africa, and their developments over time. Focusing primarily on the sub-Saharan regions, will explore a variety of sources that historians of Africa use to examine issues such as state formation, trade and commerce, gender and society, slavery, European imperialism and colonialism, African nationalism, and independence.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2CP

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3412X - Islam in Africa

    Beginning with an overview of processes of Islamization in Africa, the course will focus primarily on the variety of Islamic experiences on the continent, the relationships between Islam and trade, and state formation, questions of race and slavery in African Muslim societies, the African Diaspora in the Middle East and beyond. Other topics include Islam and colonial rule and interactions between Muslims and non-believers.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: lecture

  • HIST 3420 - History of South Africa

    Establishment and transformation of African societies (Bantu migrations); coming of Europeans; evolution of Cape society (Black, White, Colored); conflicting nationalisms; Great Trek; rise of Zulu kingdom and the Mfecane; mineral revolution and subjection of African chiefdoms; British imperialism and coming of South African (Boer) War.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3440 - History of Vietnam

    Modern Vietnamese civilization since 15th- century, emphasizing political and social change after 1800.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3450 - Southeast Asia to c. 1750: The Creative Synthesis

    Highlights of prehistory and proto-history and development of classical states. Emphasis on cultural synthesis (Hindu, Buddhist, Muslim, and animist influences) and theme of change and continuity in both great and little traditions of region.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2CP

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3451 - Southeast Asia, c. 1750 to 1945: Change and Conflict

    Indigenous change and widening effects of western penetration, with emphasis on social and cultural developments. Nature of western and Japanese colonialism in region, and response of the colonized seen in light of both traditional and modern influences.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2CP

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3452 - Southeast Asia, 1945 to the Present: The Search for Stability

    The great national revolutions of the 1940s. Social and cultural context of nationalism and revolt, search for new political forms, and struggle against disunity and poverty.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2CP

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3463 - History of China from Antiquity to the Early Modern Era

    Present-day Chinese political, intellectual, and cultural leaders frequently claim that China has the longest continuous history of any nation in the world. Implicit in this statement is the argument that an appreciation of the deep Chinese past is necessary for any considered understanding of contemporary China. This course provides a narrative of that past by tracing the history of pre-dynastic and dynastic China from antiquity to the early modern era. The continuities and discontinuities between different historical periods are emphasized. The course concludes with a re-evaluation of what the Chinese past reveals about the Chinese present.

    Requisites: (Soph or Jr or Sr) and Warning: no credit for both this and the following: HIST 3460 or HIST 3461

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3464 - History of China from the Early Modern Era to the Present

    The extraordinary transformations in contemporary China are a focus of fascination, anxiety, and confusion both inside and outside of China. Though seemingly sudden, these changes have deep roots in Chinese history. This course presents a narrative of that past by tracing the history of the late imperial and the post-dynastic eras. The course concludes with an examination of present-day China.

    Requisites: (Soph or Jr or Sr) and not HIST 3462

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3480 - Traditional Japan

    Traces major elements of Japanese culture and thought from their origins, through major Chinese influence, results of medieval civil warfare (including development of Samurai values), and up to premodern workings of Japan's sophisticated commercial economy.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3481 - Modern Japan

    Political weakness of Tokugawa system leading to opening of Japan to Western trade and restoration of emperor; favorable economic and political base that allowed Japan to enter successfully into competition with European nations; Japan's ultranationalist era, the Pacific War and postwar reconstruction. Contemporary Japan and its new role in the world.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3500 - Science and Society in the Modern World

    From the end of the Scientific Revolution to contemporary debates surrounding human-made climate change, this course examines key themes in the history of science since the 18th century. It treats science as both an evolving set of practices and methods as well as a body of knowledge, including developments such as thermodynamics, evolutionary biology, germ theory, the periodic table of the elements, and discovery of the human genome. It also considers apparently unsuccessful developments, such as phrenology, catastrophism, and Lamarckianism. Students will learn about the socially-contingent nature of science, the relationship between science and politics, and the efforts made to divide science from pseudoscience.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2SS

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3501 - Nature, Science and Religion to 1800

    Overview of the history of science from the ancient world to the 17th- century. Examines areas of knowledge and technique most modern people consider to be a part of science, and some they do not, including medicine, astronomy, construction, mining, navigation, and warfare. Considers how politics, economy, gender, and religion affected the development of these technologies and sciences.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3520 - Roman Law & Society

    Historical introduction to Roman law, interpretation of legal sources, and especially the role of law in Roman society and culture. Chronological focus is on the Empire through the age of Justinian. After a survey of the origins of Roman law, lectures and readings use legal sources to look in two directions: downwards to the way law affected social life; upwards to how politics and governance affected law. Attention will be given throughout to how the nature of different types of legal evidence affect our interpretation of the purpose and effectiveness of law. Specific topics of focus will include the bearing of law on marriage and family life, slavery and freedom, surveillance, and religion.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2CP

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3531 - The Barbarian West: Europe 400-1000

    Foundation of Medieval synthesis, 300-1100; collapse of Roman world, establishment of successor states, spread of Christianity, formation and development of European culture.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3532 - History of the Crusades

    Surveys the major European crusades to the Middle East, with comparison to the Albigrensian, Iberian, and Baltic crusades. Focuses on the interaction and perspective of the different Christian, Jewish, and Muslim communities, and the impact of crusading ideology on western history.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3533 - Europe in the Middle Ages, 1000-1350

    Survey of Europe in the High Middle Ages (1000-1350), covering the cultures of chivalry and Scholasticism, the growth of cities, agricultural revolution, religious reform and persecution, holy wars, and the origins of the modern state.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3540 - History of Early Christianity

    Investigates historical development and spread of Christianity from its origins to about A.D. 600. Content includes Greek and Hebraic backgrounds, early church fathers of East and West, ecumenical councils, early heresies, and development of church doctrine.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3541 - Medieval Christianity: Church and Society

    Historical developments within Christian society between 5th- and 14th- centuries, with special focus on western Europe and the church of Rome. Includes the inner financial and legal workings of the church; monks as reformers and representatives of the papacy; heresy, mysticism, and the problem of uncovering popular devotion; the importance of gender in shaping religious theory and practice; cooperation and conflict between religious leaders and worldly rulers. Along with a textbook, students read, analyze, and discuss original source material in translation.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3542 - The European Reformation

    Protestant, Catholic, and Counter-Reformations in Europe, showing their relationships to social, political, economic, and religious movements of 15th- and 16th- centuries. Roles of Luther, Zwingli, Calvin, Erasmus, Loyola, etc.; Protestant and Catholic churches and sects in western and eastern Europe.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3555 - Women in Medieval Europe

    Selected topics in the history of European women between 500 and 1500, including sexuality, motherhood, family, work, Christianity (beliefs and practices), Islam and Judaism, rulership and power, sanctity, literacy, and love. Students will explore primary sources and current scholarship.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3560 - The Italian Renaissance

    Explores Italian urban life and culture, the courtly world of political elites, education reform and Humanism, religious expression and the Papal court, scientific and medical discovery, art and expressions of power in Italy, 1350-1550. It also examines the darker side of Renaissance culture - violence, sexual deviance, and social repression.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3562 - Muslims, Christians, and Jews in the History of Medieval Spain

    Covers the history of the Iberian peninsula from late antiquity to the Renaissance, focusing especially on the political cultural interactions of the Christians, Jews, and eventually Muslims under Visigothic Kings, the rise of the Cordoban Caliphate, and the process of Christian Reconquest. Particular attention is given to the internal state of "convivencia" - Living together of Christians, Jews and Muslims - as well as the relationship of Iberia to the wider European World.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3580 - Power and Revolution in Early Modern Europe, 1450-1650

    Explores major political, economic, social and religious developments in Europe from the Age of Discovery (the Americas) to the Thirty Years' War. Will explore this period as one of ideological change through emphasis on "revoltuions" in world-view, religion, social structure, politics and science/medicine in Europe.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3581 - Politics, Power and People in Europe, 1650-1775

    Explores major political, economic, intellectual and social developments in Europe (particular attention given to France, Spain, Germany), 1650 to eve of French Revolution. Emphasis on absolutism & despotism, diplomatic revolution, competition for empire, Enlightenment and emergence of a 'public' as agent of change.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3600 - Women in Early Modern European History, 1400-1800

    Explores the social, cultural,political, and economic roles of women in Europe from the 15th- through the 18th- centuries. Students will examine women as monarchs, nobles and peasants; as actresses, musicians, and playwrights; as mothers, wives, and daughters; as Christians, Jews, and Muslims; as scientists and scholars; and as witches, prostitutes,and criminals. Key issues will include women's political power and participation in politics; sexuality and the body; women's spiritual and religious roles; and women's interactions with men. The Early Modern period sets the stage for a changing history of women in Europe, and the class will thus underline the ways in which women's roles evolved and changed over the course of early modern Europe.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3640 - Europe Between World Wars, 1919-1939

    Fascism, Communism, World Depression, and 20-Year Armistice between 1919 and 1939. Economic and cultural approach.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3641 - Contemporary Europe

    Will consider key themes in the history of postwar Europe. We will explore Europe's division and ethnic cleansing in 1945, efforts of pan-European State Socialist and Atlanticist integration, Europe's imperial/colonial struggles and cultural-religious transformations. We will also consider the impact of the collapse of the Soviet Empire in Europe and the emergence of newly independent states in former Soviet spaces as well as the wars of Yugoslav disintegration and European integration. We will conclude with a survey of current issues in European political, cultural, and social life.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3680 - Germany in the 19th- Century

    Cosmopolitanism and movement to create national German state; rise of capitalism and decline of handicraft; liberation of German peasantry; revolution of 1848 and reaction; blood-and-iron chancellor; Germany's rise to European predominance; rise of worker movement; German society at turn of century.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3681 - Germany in the 20th Century

    Germany on eve of WWI; military fiasco and creation of Weimar Republic; Weimar, Berlin, Munich, and Dresden; attempt to forge democracy; Third Reich and transformation of German society; WWII and Final Solution; Communist Germany and Federal Germany; two societies and two states since 1945; unified Germany since 1990.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3682 - Nazi Germany

    Rise of Hitler to 1933; Hitler takeover; totalitarianization of Germany; Nazi foreign policy; WWII: Hitler's war on Jews; Hitler's fall; meaning of fascism.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3683 - Germany between East and West since 1945

    This course situates Germany in European history, and focuses on the political, social, and cultural history of Germany since 1945. After a brief overview of the Nazi regime, World War II, and the Holocaust, the course explores the Allied occupation of Germany, denazification, the Cold War division into West and East Germany, and each state's political, social, and diplomatic development. Themes explored include ideological developments, gender relations, generational change, labor migration, and the public memory of the Nazi past. West and East Germany are also explored within the context of the Western and Soviet Blocs in the Cold War. The course concludes with the revolutions of 1989, German reunification, and political and social developments from 1990 to the present

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3710 - Magic, Heresy and Witchcraft in Europe

    History of dangerous beliefs and practices in Europe from antiquity through the 18th- century; historical origins; legal treatment and punishment; roles of gender, the law, church and state; Inquisition and witch hunts and trials.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3715 - Sex, Crime and Deviance in Europe, 1200-1800

    Explores sexuality, deviance and crime in early modern Europe, contrasting imaginary crimes, e.g. witchcraft, with "real" crimes such as highway robbery and infanticide. Examines impact of gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, and class in process of criminalization in European history, 1200-1800. Traces long-term changes in the definition, incidence and prosecution of particular crimes to changes in economy, social structure, government, religion and culture.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3731 - Balkan dreams and nightmares: Southeastern Europe from 1908 to the Present

    Focuses on the Balkans from the beginnings of the Ottoman Empire's collapse to the present. We will examine the political, military, social and cultural history of the Balkans paying special attention to how the region's people and states responded to the challenges of both World Wars, their brief interwar independence, their post-Second World War absorption into the United States and Soviet blocs. We will conclude by examining the collapse of Communism, the region's post- 1989 transformation, and the sources and impact of Yugoslavia's collapse and division as well as the efforts of other countries in the Balkans to take part in European integration.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3741 - Origins of World War II, 1914-1941

    International problems of peace and war, international organization and alliances.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3742 - The Cold War, 1941-1989

    International problems of peace and war on worldwide scale since 1939, international organization and alliances. Topics will include global balance of power and ideologies.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3750 - World War I

    Covers the course of the "Great War" including its origins, conduct and aftermath. We will consider the military, diplomatic, and cultural factors that led to the outbreak of the war as well as how and why European governments and peoples were willing and able to sustain and expand their war. In addition to an intensive focus on the fighting itself the war's great battles as well as the experience of combat of ordinary soldiers special topics will include (among others) the Armenian genocide, the deployment of WMDs (including both poison gas and blockades), wartime technological and military developments, the war at sea, the break-up of multi-national empires and the changing understanding and representation of the war.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3770 - The Holocaust

    The origins of anti-Semitism in the West, the development of Nazi genocide, the reactions, including resistance, of European Jews, and the actions and inactions of bystander groups, Nazi persecution of other groups (Roma, Slavs, homosexuals, etc.) in the same period.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3790 - History of Sea Power

    Examination the role of navies and maritime strategy in war, diplomacy, and the world economy from ancient times to the present. The focus is on the development of the British and American sea power: doctrine and operations; the impact of politics, culture, geography, finance, and technology; and the future of sea power.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3791 - Britain and the World since 1970

    Examines British history in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, focusing on Britain's role in world politics since its retreat from empire. Topics include: relations with Europe, the Commonwealth, and the United States; the nuclear deterrent and wider defense policy, including wars from the South Atlantic to South Asia; the development of oil and gas in the North Sea; economic liberalization and the renaissance of London as a global financial center; questions over national identity and unity, particularly Scotland and Brexit; the challenges of terrorism and hybrid warfare at home and abroad; Elizabeth II, Margaret Thatcher, Tony Blair, and other key personalities of the era.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3820 - History of Russia

    Russian origins, Greek and Mongol influences, expansion of Muscovy, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, Catherine the Great, Russia as great power, and shapes of its 19th-century society.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3821 - Russia: Road to Revolution 1825-1917

    From czarist Russia to the communist revolution. Background for revolution: origins of Russian socialism, rapid social and economic change, 1905 Revolution, war and the collapse of the Romanov dynasty in 1917.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3822 - Soviet Union

    Soviet Union since the 1917 Revolution. Stalinism, WWII and expansion, Krushchev, Brezhnev. Emphasis on internal affairs.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3823 - The USSR in World War II

    History of the Soviet Union during WWII. Topics include wartime diplomacy, espionage, social and political history of the USSR during the war, the creation of the communist states in Eastern Europe after the war, and the origins of the cold war.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3831 - Modern Poland: War, Revolution and Peace from 1905 to the Present

    Explores developments in Poland from partition to independence; Polish struggles for sovereignty and imperial expansion in Eastern Europe; politics and culture in a multinational Poland, the tragedies of World War II, the Holocaust and subordination to the Soviet Union; the popular struggle to build a new, ethnically cleansed Poland and win autonomy with the eastern bloc; the vitality of religious life and nationalism; Poles' successful struggle to free their country from Soviet control and Poland's renewed independence after 1989. We will conclude by studying Poland's contemporary society and politics.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3840 - Ethnic Cleansing in Modern European History

    Studies ethnic cleansing as a central issue in European history - including Europe's colonies. Ethnic cleansing (for much of the 20th century termed "population transfer" or "expulsion") was a policy initiated by numerous great and minor powers from the beginning to the end of the 20th century and provides important perspective on the development of human rights law and state and nation building (and empire breaking) throughout this time. Also considers how the legacy of ethnic cleansing lives on in international relations, politics, the arts, and the popular attitudes and culture of the victims and perpetrators of ethnic cleansing, and their relations toward one another and in the broader international community.

    Requisites: (Soph or Jr or Sr) and Warning: not credit if taken after HIST 369N

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3860 - Shakespeare's England, 1450-1603

    Surveys English history from the Wars of the Roses until the death of Queen Elizabeth I in 1603. During this period, England went from a country ravaged by internal war and depression to one characterized at home by peace, law and order, a rising prosperity, artistic and intellectual excellence, and abroad by war as its people and power spread beyond the shores of the British Isles. Major themes to be considered include the establishment of legal and social order in the wake of the Wars of the Roses; the Tudor ¿revolution in government; the Henrician and Protestant Reformations and their effects on English political, social, and cultural life; the economic disaster of the mid sixteenth century; overseas exploration; the flowering of English culture and the arts; war with Spain; relations with Scotland and Ireland; and the ways in which England was governed.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3861 - Revolutionary Britain, 1603-1702

    Surveys English history during the reign of the Stuarts. Major themes to be considered include the union of the crowns of England and Scotland and the problems of multiple monarchies; the nascent British empire; the nature of religious life in a post-Reformation world; the often fractious relationship between religion and politics; radicalism during the Civil War and Interregnum and its lasting effects on English political, religious, intellectual, and cultural life; and England's roles on the European and world stages.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3862 - English History to 1688

    Surveys the social, political, religious, and constitutional history of England from its first settlement until the end of James II's reign. Major topics to be considered include the impact of the Roman, Christian, Viking, and Norman conquests of England; the demographic, social, and political crises of the late medieval period; religious reformation during the 16th- century; and England's relationship to Britain, Europe, and the world.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3864 - Making Modern Britain, 1702-1815

    Surveys Britain's history between the War of the Spanish Succession and the end of the Napoleonic Wars. Major themes to be considered include the development of a fiscal-military state; the birth of modern party politics; economic growth and its consequences; the expansion of Britain's world power and the loss of its North American colonies; the place of religious beliefs and institutions in an increasingly polite and commercial society; the pressures for social and political reforms; and the "Second Hundred Years War" with France.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3865 - Churchill's Britain

    Britain in the 20th- century, focusing on the country's decline from world power: Britain's modern constitution; the onset of trouble before 1914; the experience of two world wars; society and policy between the wars, especially appeasement and its background; postwar developments, including the welfare state, the "special relationship" with the United States, and European integration.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3866 - Afghan Wars

    Examines the history of strategic rivalry in Afghanistan and the borderlands of Central, South, and West Asia. Topics include the geopolitical setting and premodern precedents of contemporary policy; Britain's Afghan Wars and the Great Game of empire in Asia; the interests and influences of Pakistan, Iran, India, and China; the Soviet war of the 1980s and its consequences; and developments since 2001.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3867 - British Empire in the 19th Century

    Examines sources, strategies, ideologies, and impact of the British Empire in the 19th- century. Evaluation of British imperialism from regional as well as metropolitan perspectives, giving particular emphasis to the imperial roots of globalization; how the use of technology and information interlocked the British Empire as a worldwide network of trade, investment, migration, and military power.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3868 - British Empire in the 20th Century

    Evaluation of the fate of the British Empire in the 20th- century, focusing on the global impact as well as the process of decolonization. Topics include the question of imperial overstretch; development of the Commonwealth; India's independence; and Britain's withdrawal from its smaller dependencies in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East through the return of Hong Kong to China in 1997.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3900 - History Through Film

    Examination of selected topics in the United States, European, or Third World history through films and readings accompanied by lectures and discussion.

    Requisites: Soph or Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 6.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 3970T - History Tutorial, Third year, Non-thesis

    Individualized tutorial for HTC students only.

    Requisites: Permission required and HTC

    Credits: 1 - 15

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 15.0 tutorial

  • HIST 3980T - Honors Tutorial Study, Third Year, Non-thesis

    Individualized tutorial for HTC students only.

    Requisites: Permission required and HTC

    Credits: 1 - 15

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 15.0 tutorial

  • HIST 4500 - The New Deal and Its Challengers, 1933-1945

    This course examines the political economy of the New Deal, the broad program of relief, recovery, and reform that President Franklin Roosevelt's Administration implemented in response to the Great Depression. It surveys the reaction to these unprecedented government efforts across the political spectrum, with an emphasis on the New Deal's most articulate critics. And it considers how Roosevelt's major domestic and foreign policies influenced the direction of both liberalism and conservatism in the United States from the decade of the thirties through the end of World War II.

    Requisites: Sr and HIST 2010 and 6 additional hours in History

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 seminar

  • HIST 4536 - Eternal Rome: Power and Piety

    An interdisciplinary course on the political, religious, and topographical history of the city and its environs over a long time span. The focus is on periods of dramatic change, both political and physical, including the time around the reigns of the first Roman emperor, Augustus, and the first Christian emperor, Constantine; medieval and Renaissance Rome under papal Rome; and the Fascist excavation and recasting of the ancient city. This course may be offered as an education abroad opportunity.

    Requisites: (AH 2110 or CLAR 2120 or HIST 1210) and (CLAS 2540 or 2550 or HIST 3292 or 3531) and Sr only

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

  • HIST 4770 - Perspectives on the Holocaust: Sources and Interpretation

    This seminar-style course introduces students to working closely with, researching, and writing and speaking about Holocaust-related sources. After a brief overview of the Nazi period and the Holocaust, discussions focus on five major themes: the diversity of Jewish experience during the Holocaust; gender and the Holocaust; the perspectives of perpetrators and bystanders/enablers; comparisons between diaries and memoirs in order to explore how memory influences understanding of past events; and representations of the Holocaust in literature and the arts since 1945. Students also develop their skills in academic writing, research and textual analysis, and participate in complex debates about past events and their impact on the present.

    Requisites: Senior and (HIST 3281 or 3681 or HIST 3682 or HIST 3770) and an additional 6 credit hours in History, for a total of 9 credit hours

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 seminar

  • HIST 4900 - Special Topics in History

    Specific course content will vary with offering.

    Credits: 1 - 15

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 1.0 lecture

  • HIST 4901 - Colloquium in United States History

    Literature and source materials in United States history. Readings and reports.

    Requisites: 18 Hours in HIST

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 9.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 seminar

  • HIST 4902 - Colloquium in Latin American History

    Literature and source materials of Latin American history. Readings and reports.

    Requisites: HIST 3230 or 3231 or 3232 or 3233 or 3250

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 9.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 seminar

  • HIST 4903 - Colloquium in European History

    Literature and source materials in European History from ancient times to the present. Readings and writing.

    Requisites: 18 Hours in HIST

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 9.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 seminar

  • HIST 4904 - Colloquium in the History of Southeast Asia

    Issues and topics in Southeast Asian history and culture generally, with particular emphasis on selected developments in 19th- and 20th-centuries. Readings and reports.

    Requisites: 18 Hours in HIST

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 9.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 seminar

  • HIST 4905 - Colloquium in Middle Eastern History

    Selected topics on Middle Eastern history. Readings and reports.

    Requisites: 18 Hours in HIST

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 9.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 seminar

  • HIST 4906 - Colloquium in African History

    Literature and source materials of African history. Readings and reports.

    Requisites: 18 Hours in (HIST or INST) or (9 hours in HIST and 9 hours in INST)

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 9.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 seminar

  • HIST 4907 - Colloquium in East Asian History

    Selected topics in the history of Japan, China or Korea. Readings and reports.

    Requisites: 18 Hours in HIST

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 9.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 seminar

  • HIST 4910 - History Internship

    Designed to enhance skills for history majors through history-related work assignments in public and private agencies.

    Requisites: Permission required and HIST major and (Jr or Sr) and 3.0 GPA

    Credits: 1 - 4

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 8.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 internship

  • HIST 4930 - Directed Study in History

    Individualized reading and study in all areas of History.

    Requisites: Permission required

    Credits: 1 - 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 12.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 independent study

  • HIST 4940H - Honors Studies of Selected Historical Topics

    Study, reading, research, and writing on selected topic; intended for students who plan to graduate with honors in history. Arrangements should be made during junior year.

    Requisites: Permission required and HIST 3111J

    Credits: 1 - 6

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 12.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 5.0 research

  • HIST 4970T - HTC Thesis Tutorial, Fall Semester

    Thesis done in last year of History Honors Tutorial program.

    Requisites: Permission required and HTC

    Credits: 1 - 15

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 15.0 tutorial

  • HIST 4980T - HTC Thesis Tutorial, Spring Semester

    Thesis done in last year of History Honors Tutorial program.

    Requisites: Permission required and HTC

    Credits: 1 - 15

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 15.0 tutorial

  • College of Arts & Sciences